It is true that my writings contain ideas which could be regarded by some as ‘speculative’, ‘philosophical’, sometimes even ‘religious’ or ‘metaphysical’, not always remaining strictly within the confines of accepted scientific and psychological thought. However, this is the very essence of my idea of Multi-Dimensional (M-D) thinking. That is, being able to shift to deeper levels of understanding by integrating information from a number of different sources. This can be likened to holding up different transparencies to the light and superimposing one upon the other, in order to arrive at a more complete picture of the whole. The question is whether you are prepared to risk leaving the security of your present type of thinking and at least being willing to consider other approaches.

 

My personal experience is that being able to understand, work and move about freely within a broader thinking paradigm is essential for entering the higher stages of understanding, as your mind has to be totally free to explore new ideas on reality, the universe, and what it really means to be human.

 

Let me show you the power of Multi-dimensional Thinking by solving the old riddle of ‘which came first, the chicken or the egg?’ Scholars have been busy with this puzzle for many years, and it personally took me seven years to eventually figure it out. This is a classic example of staring ourselves blind against words and concepts, being unable to think outside of the box and missing the bigger picture. For many years we have been going around in circles because we were trapped by the old ideas of a ‘chicken’ and an ‘egg’. However, in order to solve the riddle, we have to move beyond the obvious to deeper levels, to our actual choice of words, to principles of our minds and thinking (what we really mean and understand by a ‘chicken’ and an ‘egg’ in semantics and symbolism and even beyond that to other universal laws governing the natural sciences.

 

In the past, combining or cross-referencing information from different paradigms and sources in this way may have ruffled a few ‘intellectual feathers’. However, as you will see, the solution to this kind of problem can often only be discovered when viewed ‘multi-dimensionally’. I will therefore recount the process I followed in arriving at my conclusion in order to demonstrate the use of M-D thinking in solving such ‘thinking’ problems.

 

First, I noticed that solving the riddle of the chicken and the egg is like trying to find the starting point in a circle and simply going around and around. I then began to think multi-dimensionally and realized that I had to turn the ‘circle’ on its end and pass through to the other side to the dimension or world of symbols where things have a far deeper meaning.

 

I then began to examine the symbolism underlying the actual biology of a chicken and an egg and realised that a ‘chicken’ can actually stand in for, or represent, any living form. And the ‘egg’, in turn, symbolizes the reproductive process. By shifting back to a scientific paradigm and applying the fundamentals of the natural sciences it became clear that a reproductive process cannot come before the living animal itself. In other words, it must be linked to something that is already alive. In the case of a chicken, it would be a live animal (or bird) mature enough to produce an egg. In this way, I came to the conclusion that the chicken must have come first.

 

This was the easy part, but I had still not answered the question of where the chicken came from, if not from another egg. This process of moving backwards in time, pointed to the dimension of universal principles, and specifically the principle of Evolution, which, incidentally, is one of my favourites. Working with this principle, I was prompted to look beyond the ‘chicken’ to the very beginnings of life. The fact is that the ‘chicken’ did not drop out of the sky fully formed, but as is generally accepted, went through a process of evolution and development to reach the form it is today. So to answer the question of from where the chicken came, I played the evolutionary ‘card’ and also dabbled a little with words (the field of semantics). By superimposing the three different dimensions in this way, I concluded that the chicken came from the egg of ‘something’ which resembled a chicken, which, in turn (over millions of years), came from the egg of something ‘which did not quite resemble a chicken’ and even beyond that from something ‘which did not resemble a chicken at all’ and from a reproductive process which did not include an egg at all, namely cellular division of the first batch of living cells.

 

In other words, if I am asked where the chicken came from, I would have to say ‘another form of life’, and by this I actually mean that it ultimately came from the first living organism which reproduced itself and evolved until it became capable of laying eggs. At that time the cycle of the chicken and the eggs began.

 

You can now see how I integrated three dimensions, namely symbolism, semantics (the meaning of words), as well as the natural evolutionary sciences to arrive at a conclusion. Whether or not you agree with my findings is another story. The point that I am trying to make is that it is not really possible to answer complex problems using only normal two-dimensional thinking.

 

The Shadow-Self